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BATTLEFLEET 1900
PRE-DREADNOUGHT NAVAL WARFARE: 1890-1905



Combat Chart Overview

Introduction
The various tables on the combat chart are used to resolve combat results, calculate damage effects and offer references for game play. For tables which require die rolling, a note in the upper right corner will tell how many six sided dice apply to each die roll entry on that table. Hence "1D6" means one six sided die is used for each die roll, "2D6" means two six sided dice are used for each die roll. The tables themselves are mostly cross reference style, although a few of them use multiple cross references to guide players through several sets of options. These actually save game time by compounding several actions together into one sequence. The following guide is based on the standard combat chart. Where necessary reference may be made to optional combat charts also available on the Battlefleet 1900 home page.

AP Hits Table – Outline
This table is used for armor piercing (AP) incoming rounds. Resolve these shell hits by rolling one six sided die for each round. Each 1 result is considered to hit the Vitals of the target, all 2 results are considered to hit the Upperworks of the target.

Once all hits are established, compare the penetration value of the hits to the applicable armor value of the target vessel. The resulting percentage variation or Penetration Differential is then cross referenced with a second set of die roll results – one roll for each upperworks and vitals hit – in order to arrive at the Hit Codes in the body of the table. The hit codes are then added to the ship's log.

AP Hits Table – Details
Hit Dice: Once a player has guessed the correct range to an enemy ship and scored a hit zone, one six sided die is rolled for each incoming round to see which ones struck the target. These should be rolled for in sets according to ship and shell size; for example, if a ship lands four main rounds and seven secondary rounds into a hit zone, roll one set of four dice for the mains, and another set of seven dice for the secondaries (fourteen secondary dice if the secondaries have an ROF of two). Using the standard chart, hit roll results of 3 through 6 are considered to have exploded harmlessly in the water, dudded or to have struck portions of the ship not critical for game play. Each 2 result is considered to hit the Upperworks of the target, all 1 results are considered to hit the Vitals of the target. The lower portion of the table (number one) acts as a brief guide to remind players which incoming round die rolls count as Upperworks hits (2) and which count as Vitals hit (1). Only those rounds which hit vitals or upperworks are eligible to cause further damage to the ship. Note that the Fast Play combat chart increases the incidence of hits by changing the vitals/upperworks die rolls from a 1 and 2 to a 1,2 and 3,4 respectively.

Hit Columns: All results are based on the percentage difference between the penetration value of the striking round and the armor value of the area that is hit. This is called the Penetration Differential. So for example if the striking round's penetration value is half or more of the armor value for the part of the target that was hit, use the 50 percent or greater column to check for damage. If the penetration value of a striking round is equal to or greater than the armor value for the part of the target that was hit, use the 100 percent or greater column. The column used must always correspond to the part of the ship that was hit: Upperworks or Vitals. Those rounds which have an armor penetration value less than half that of the armor in question cannot do any damage.

Damage Dice: Once the correct Penetration Differential column (number two) is established, roll one six sided die (1D6) for each striking round. Cross index each modified die roll result under the Die Roll column (number three) with the previously established Penetration Differential column to find the code(s) for the damage inflicted (number four).

Modifiers: Upperworks hits may end up being modified by the Upperworks protection rating assigned to each ship. Vessels which have Great, Poor or None upperworks protection ratings will have damage dice against them modified by the amounts shown at the bottom of the table. Hence any player rolling for upperworks damage against a ship that has a Great rating will suffer a minus one (-1) to all upperworks damage dice. These modifiers never apply to hit dice or any vitals damage dice. The None protection modifier may result in a modified roll result of 8, which is why there is an "8+" line on the chart.
Shell Hit Example #1: Four 30cm guns with a penetration index of 18-14-10 are fired at medium AP range (second range bracket) onto a battleship with 14-5 armor. The shell penetration will be 14, and the battleship armor is 14 for vitals and 5 for upperworks. Assuming the firing ship scores a hit zone by guessing the correct range, it rolls four dice - one each for the four main guns. The die results are a 2, 5, 5 and 6. Two hits are against the target upperworks and one is against the vitals. This means that the players would check for damage effects by rolling once on the 100> column of the vitals portion of the table and twice on the 200> column of the upperworks portion of the table.

If the final damage die rolls were a 1 and a3 for the upperworks hit and a 4 for the vitals hit, the target battleship would suffer one secondary position damaged and one main position destroyed. The secondary damage was caused by one of the upperworks hits and the destroyed main was caused by the vitals hit.

Shell Hit Example #2: Four 20cm guns with a penetration of 8-5-3 are fired at long AP range (third range bracket) onto a cruiser with 8-4 armor. The shell penetration will be a 3, and the cruiser armor is 8 for its vitals and 4 for its upperworks. The target also has a Poor Upperworks protection rating. Assuming the firing ship scores a hit zone by guessing the correct range, it rolls four dice – one for each gun. If the hit die results are a 2, 2, 3 and 5, only one round is eligible to cause damage by hitting the upperworks. The player rolls again on the 50> column of the Upperworks section with a plus one (+1) to the die roll because the target ship has poor upperworks protection. This is because the penetration was a 3 and the upperworks armor was a 4. Meaning the armor was too thick for the shell to penetrate, but the poor rating meant that the existing armor did not have very good coverage. A damage die roll of 4 would go to a 5, causing one T hit. If the damage die roll were a 5, it would go to a 6, causing one S hit.

HE Hits Table – Outline
This table is used for high explosive (HE) incoming rounds. Resolve these shell hits by rolling one six sided die for each round. Each 1 result is considered to hit the Vitals of the target, all 2 results are considered to hit the Upperworks of the target.

Once all hits are established, compare the size of the incoming round to the size of the target vessel. The resulting percentage variation or Hit to Ship Differential is then cross referenced with a second set of die roll results – one roll for each upperworks and vitals hit – to arrive at the Hit Codes in the body of the table. The hit codes are then added to the ship's log.




HE Hits Table – Details
Hit Dice: Once a player has guessed the correct range to an enemy ship and scored a hit zone, one six sided die is rolled for each incoming round to see which ones struck the target. These should be rolled for in sets according to ship and shell size; for example, if a ship lands four main rounds and seven secondary rounds into a hit zone, roll one set of four dice for the mains, and another set of seven dice for the secondaries (fourteen secondary dice if the secondaries have an ROF of two). Hit roll results of 3 through 6 are considered to have exploded harmlessly in the water, dudded or to have struck portions of the ship not critical for game play. Each 2 result is considered to hit the Upperworks of the target, all 1 results are considered to hit the Vitals of the target. The lower portion of the table (number one) acts as a brief guide to remind players which incoming round die rolls count as Upperworks hits (2) and which count as Vitals hit (1). Only those rounds which hit vitals or upperworks are eligible to cause further damage to the ship. Note that the Fast Play combat chart increases the incidence of hits by changing the upperworks/vitals die rolls from a 1 and 2 to a 1,2 and 3,4 respectively.


Hit Columns: All results are based on the percentage difference between the size of the striking shell and the size of the target vessel. This is called the Hit to Ship Differential. So for example if the striking round's size is one-tenth or more of the of the target vessel's size, use the 10 percent or greater column to check for damage. If the striking round's size is equal to or greater than the target vessel's size, use the 100 percent or greater column. The column used must always correspond to the part of the ship that was hit: Upperworks or Vitals. Those rounds with a size rating less than ten percent of the target vessel's size rating cannot do any damage.


Damage Dice: Once the correct Hit to Ship Differential column (number two) is established, roll one six sided die (1D6) for each striking round. Cross index each modified die roll result under the Die Roll column (number three) with the previously established Differential column to find the code(s) for the damage inflicted (number four).


Modifiers: Upperworks hits may end up being modified by the Upperworks protection rating assigned to each ship. Vessels which have Great, Poor or None upperworks protection ratings will have damage dice against them modified by the amounts shown at the bottom of the table. Hence any player rolling for upperworks damage against a ship that has a Great rating will suffer a minus one (-1) to all upperworks damage dice. These modifiers never apply to hit dice or any vitals damage dice. The None protection modifier may result in a modified roll result of 8, which is why there is an "8+" line on the chart.



Shell Hit Example #1: Four 30cm guns with a size rating of 60 onto a battleship with a size rating of 55 (note that range does not affect HE impact values). Assuming the firing ship scores a hit zone by guessing the correct range, it rolls four dice – one each for the four main guns. The die results are a 2, 5, 5 and 6. Two hits are against the target upperworks and one is against the vitals. This means that the players would check for damage effects by rolling once on the 100> column of the vitals portion of the table and twice on the 100> column of the upperworks portion of the table.

If the final hit die rolls were a 1 and a3 for the upperworks hit and a 4 for the vitals hit, the target battleship would suffer one tertiary position damaged. The tertiary damage was caused by one of the upperworks hits. No damage occurred from the vitals hit, which is predictable given the less effect high explosives will have against armored areas of a ship.


Shell Hit Example #2: Four 20cm guns with a size rating of 18 onto a cruiser with a size rating of 35. The target also has a Poor Upperworks protection rating. Assuming the firing ship scores a hit zone by guessing the correct range, it rolls four dice – one for each gun. If the hit die results are a 2, 2, 3 and 5, only one round is eligible to cause damage by hitting the upperworks. The player rolls again on the 50> column of the Upperworks section with a plus one (+1) to the die roll because the target ship has poor upperworks protection. A damage die roll of 4 would go to a 5, causing one GDe hit. If the damage die roll were a 5, it would go to a 6, also causing one S hit.







General Damage Table – This table is used to cover low-odds hits and damage to external and internal areas of a ship. External general damage hits (De) are listed in the left-center column (number one) and internal general damage hits (Di) are listed in the right-center column (number two).


The far left column (number three) shows the die rolls that need to be made as a result of AP and HE shell hits. The upper half of the table is used for Upperworks (uw) hits and the lower half of the table is used for Vitals (v) hits. Note that general damage suffered as a result of upperworks shell hits and vitals shell hits are conducted as two different rolls, each of which use 1D6.

The far right column (number four) shows the die rolls that need to be made as a result of Critical Effect rolls. Note that general damage suffered as a result of critical effect hits always uses 2D6 and cover both upper and lower halves of the tables.
General Damage Example #1: An upperworks damage roll causes one Di hit. Roll one six sided die and cross index the corresponding number under the UW column with the Di - internal column and apply the resulting hit code to the ship in question. A die roll result of 3 would cause a CT hit. A die roll result of 6 would cause a 150FL hit.

General Damage Example #2: A vitals damage roll causes one De hit. Roll one six sided die and cross index the corresponding number under the V column with the De - external column and apply the resulting hit code to the ship in question. A die roll result of 3 would cause a 25FL hit. A die roll result of 6 would result in no hit unless the die roll were modified by an optional rule.

General Damage Example #3: A critical effect roll causes one De hit. Roll two six sided dice and cross index the corresponding number under the Crit Effect Rolls column with the De - external column and apply the resulting hit code to the ship in question. A die roll result of 10 would cause a BR hit. A die roll result of 5 would cause an M hit.


Flooding Occurrence – Compare the size value of a weapon against the size value of its target. The resulting percentage is used to establish which column to use on the Occurrence half of the table (number one). As with the other hit tables, all percentages are grouped on an equal to or greater than basis. The numbers in each Occurrence column (number two) are the modified die roll values needed to inflict the corresponding flooding types shown in the center of the table (number three). Make sure to apply any appropriate flood protection modifiers as required before consulting the table. The flood protection modifiers are based on the flood protection values for ships, one of which should be supplied for each vessel fighting in the game. See the ship statistics and ship log for more information about ship's flood protection values.

Modifiers: Flooding Occurrence die rolls may end up being modified by the Flooding protection rating assigned to each ship. Vessels which have Great, Poor or None flooding protection ratings will have damage dice against them modified by the amounts shown at the bottom of the table. Hence any player rolling for damage against a ship that has a Great rating will suffer a minus one (-1) to all occurrence die rolls. Flooding protection modifiers are never applied to the Effects die rolls.

Effects: If a particular flooding type results from the occurrence die roll (Light, Medium, etc) consult the Effects portion of the table and roll one more die, cross indexing the flooding type with the corresponding forward, amidships or aft area of the ship effected (number five). If the unmodified die roll result falls within the number ranges for the corresponding effects column (number four), apply the hit code(s) shown immediately above.
Flooding Example #1: A size 60 shell strikes a size 55 battleship and scores an FL result. Because the size of the shell is one-hundred percent or greater than the target vessel, a die is rolled on the 100> column with a modified result of 5, causing medium flooding on the battleship. After randomly assigning the location of the flooding to the aft section of the ship, another die roll is made on the Medium flooding line with a 4 result, causing one Propulsion hit and one Steering hit on the target. Note that a shell may not inflict any flooding if its size rating is less than one-quarter of the size rating of the target vessel.

Flooding Example #2: A size 22 round hits a size 30 armored cruiser and scores an FL result. Because the size of the shell is fifty percent or greater in value compared to the target ship's size, a die is rolled on the 50> column. On a modified die roll of 1, no result occurred.

Flooding Example #3: A size 120 torpedo hits a size 30 cruiser. Because the size of the torpedo is two-hundred percent or greater in value compared to the target ship's size, a die is rolled on the 200> column. A modified die roll of 6 results in severe flooding. Randomly locating the hit in the port side of the ship, one more die roll is made with a result of 5. Cross indexing the Severe line and the Midships column, the result is a destroyed propulsion box and an internal fire.


Critical Effects Table –There are two types of critical effects; cyclic and static. Cyclic effects are part of the basic fire and flood rules. Their ongoing presence on board a vessel constantly threatens to trigger more damage. Static effects are damage events which cause various types of specific damage all at once without any further need for tracking effects. Explosions, electric/hydraulic damage, steering malfunctions and complications to main armament/torpedo hits all constitute static critical effects.

To conduct a critical effect test, roll two six-sided dice (2D6) and cross-reference the total (number one) with the appropriate Triggering Event column (number two). Apply the results (if any) called for at the corresponding cross-index point in the hit code field (number three). Note that damage caused by a single critical effect can trigger a long string of damage events, resulting in several critical effect die rolls for various types of damage. See the damage key table (below) and rule section 4.1 for definitions of the triggering event and critical effect damage codes shown on this table.
Critical Effects Example #1: A ship suffers a penetrating (100>) armor piercing M hit. Using the triggering event column for Internal > M/TT as a starting point, the player rolls 2D6 with a result of 12, causing an E hit (explosion) on the adjoining column of the Internal triggering even table. The player rolls again for explosion effects, with a die roll result of 7 which causes a fire, an internal general damage hit and a flooding hit automatically valued for the 150> column on the Flooding Occurrence table.

Damage Key Reference – The damage key gives a brief definition of each damage or hit code called for within the various tables used on the combat chart. For broader definitions and instructions for use, see Damage & Sinking section 4.1

Listing & Sinking Table
Listing: Vessels which experience uneven flooding (different flooding point values on opposing sides or ends) are subject to increasingly severe side effects. Take the total difference in points of flooding (if any) between opposing vessel compartments and cross index this Point Difference with the type of the flooding. The two types of uneven flooding are Port/Starboard or Fore/Aft, which reflect the two sets of opposing hull compartments present on each vessel's ship log. The resulting damage hits that result from this cross reference are cumulative and remain in effect until the vessel sinks or the point difference is reduced by counter-flooding or new damage. Note that damage hits inflicted specifically as a result of uneven flooding may not be repaired directly by damage control dice. But as noted above, the effects will be eliminated or incrementally reduced if the uneven flooding condition is eliminated or reduced through other damage control steps such as counterflooding, etc.

Sinking: All vessels with a total of five or more points of flooding on board are required to roll once each turn for sinking. Locate the value on the Total FL Points column which matches the total flooding points present on a vessel and roll two six-sided dice. If the die roll result is equal to or higher than the corresponding number shown in the Sink Roll column, the vessel has begun to sink. The column at right indicates how long the vessel will take to sink if this occurs. See the Sinking & Listing portion of rules section 4.0 for more information .

Turn Cycle Reference – The turn cycle shows the order in which commanders issue orders, move their vessels, use ship's weapons and track damage. See the rules section 1.4 Turn Sequence for more information.

DC & Command Actions Table
Command Actions: The Command Function portion of this table indicates the various command related tasks available to each ship. To the right of each function is shown the minimum die roll value needed on one six-sided die (1D6) in order to that function to succeed or be carried out. Note that in the case of reading signals the modifier for BR hits is cumulative: Modifiers for BR hits (if any) on both the signalling vessel and on the intercepting vessel are combined and applied to an interception die roll.

Damage Control: The Repair Function portion of this table indicates the various repair attempts that may be attempted using a vessel's existing damage control (DC) dice. To the right of each repair function is shown the minimum die roll result needed on one six-sided die (1D6) in order to that repair to succeed. Note that each damage slash on a ship's log requires a separate repair die roll, multiple damage slashes cannot be fully repaired with a single damage control die roll and destroyed features may not be repaired under at all during a game.

The left side of the table includes a short outline of important modifiers and restrictions which apply to the command and/or repair die rolls. The most important is the note limiting repairs attempts to one die roll per hit. This means for example, that if a ship feature has two damage hits on it (let's say two damage slashes on a Main gun position) the commanding player can only roll two DC dice on any one turn while attempting repairs. He could not pile six DC dice onto the one disabled position in an attempt to fix it.

Torpedoes Table – Summary: The Torpedo Hit Chart cross-indexes the relative courses of the launching and target vessels with the orientation of the target. The resulting value is that required to score a hit using three six-sided dice (3D6).

Torpedoes Table – Details: Begin by establishing whether the combined courses of the launching ship and its target are converging or diverging. Two vessels are converging if their combined courses are carrying them toward each other. If either vessel is moving away from the other in any way, they are considered to be on diverging courses. A good way to establish this is to look at the miniatures and see if they are pointing toward or away from each other. If either model points away from the other, however slightly, then it is a diverging course.

Once the combined course has been decided, establish whether the angle of the target vessel is a rake "shot" or a beam shot. A rake angle means the target vessel has its bow or stern wholly or partially pointed toward the launching vessel. A broadside angle means that the target vessel is substantially presenting its side to the launching vessel. Any torpedoes fired from within a target vessel's front or rear arc is considered a rake shot. A beam shot is any torpedo fired from within either of a target vessel's beam arcs. Once these two factors are established, roll the dice and modify them using the appropriate modifiers defined below.

Die Roll Modifiers: All die roll modifiers for firing torpedoes are cumulative. Note that unlike the other tables on the Battlefleet 1900 combat chart, the torpedo launch table requires the rolling of three six-sided dice (3D6) per torpedo.
DD/TB Firing: Add one point to the hit die roll if the vessel launching the torpedo is a destroyer, torpedo boat or torpedo gunboat.
Slow attacker & target: Add one point to the hit die roll if the launching (attacking) vessel moved under half of its original available speed during the current turn, and add another one point to the hit die roll if the target (defending) vessel also moved less than half of its original available speed during the current turn.
Stationary target: Add two points to the hit die roll if the target vessel did not move at all during the current turn. This modifier supersedes the Slow target modifier above, both modifiers cannot be used in the same hit rolls. However the Slow attacker modifier may still be used in conjunction with the Stationary target modifier.
Choppy/Rough Seas: Subtract one point from the hit die roll if the sea condition at the time of the game is choppy. Subtract two points from the hit die roll if the sea condition at the time of the game is rough.
Distance: Less than 10 Cables: Subtract three points from the hit die roll if the distance to the target vessel is greater than five cables, out to the maximum torpedo range of 10 cables. A cable is a nautical unit of measure. The game distance for one cable is available on the Scale Sheet and can be marked on the combat chart under the Torpedoes table.
Distance: Less than 5 Cables: Subtract one point from the hit die roll if the distance to the target vessel is greater than two cables, and equal to or less than five cables.
Distance: Less than 2 Cables: Apply no range modifiers to the hit die roll if the distance to the target vessel is equal to or less than two cables.

Positions Reference – This reference box presents a short overview of the various gun positions and armament layouts available to the many different ships of the period. The diagram shows the basic turreted position codes and their respective arcs of fire as well as the basic arc of fire values for the various sponsoned and casemated beam patterns commonly used for secondary armaments. For more details see the Positions portion of section of 3.1 Targets and Positions.
 
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